Curiosity

It’s been a while since my last post, but time is moving way too fast.

sissihoa

Garm is now nearly four months old. He loves peoples and other dogs to that degree it’s almost impossible to take him for a walk. Every time he sees someone he wants to meet them. It doesn’t matter how far away they are, if he can see them he tries his best to get to them.
His reaction to meeting people is over excitement and biting. Combined with his natural urge to bite because of his teeth itching there is a lot of biting. Thankfully, with a lot of help from my friends,  he lately seems to calm down and the biting gradually stops.

Like other puppies he is very curious and everything needs to be checked out. A few days ago he saw his first airplane when a small plane flew across at low altitude. He sat down staring at the plain like a kid would stare meeting “batman” for the first time. Only after the plane was way out of sight I managed to regain his attention.

Yesterday Garm decided to investigate the bottom of the river. I’m not sure how for long a dog can hold his breath but he stayed under for quite some time.

A puppy’s curiosity is also the biggest obstacle when trying to train him. The best thing to do is just let them investigate until they settle down, and then continue the training.

 

The little devil

Garm has now been part of my little family for a month. In this time he has doubled his weight, his ears are now standing straight, he has not had an accident inside for two and a half week and he masters the basic commands… when he wants to.

_DSC8831

Like any puppy Garm has two sides. A man’s best friend, and man’s worst nightmare. Most of the time he eats, sleeps, play’s, looks like the sweetest little angel and everything is fun and joy. But if you push it a bit too far he soon turns to a four legged little devil who try to suck the life force out of you. Typical scenarios are disobedience, biting, eating anything he comes across, running around like mad, barking, itching all over, whining and biting some more.

There are several reasons for your puppy to disobey you. Most of them are your own fault.
The dog may want to test you for position.
His natural curiosity demands his attention somewhere else. A puppy needs to explore and you should let him do so as long as it is safe.
Your commands confuses him. He doesn’t understand you.
You have pushed him to far and now he’s scared or angry.
He need a private moment behind some bushes to relive himself. He is sick.
He is stressed. He is tired.

_DSC8862

Whatever the reason you should stop the training immediately. Trying to force a response will probably only get you both frustrated and ruin earlier training. Training should be done only when you know your dog is up to it and you have his complete attention. If you have a failsafe command/situation where you know your dog will do as expected, use that to finish in a positive manner for both dog and trainer and then figure out what bothers him.

Normally some hours with quality sleep fixes most of the issues above and you as the trainer should use the quiet time to figure out what went wrong and how to avoid it in the future. It is no use in getting angry at the dog. He only reacts as any puppy/child would do in the given situation.